According to a recent study published in the April issue of JAMA, eating higher amounts of added sugars in processed foods is associated with lower levels of HDL, the “good cholesterol” and higher levels of triglycerides, which is an important risk factor that can lead to cardiovascular disease.

The authors of the study said “In the United States, total consumption of sugar has increased substantially in recent decades, largely owing to an increased intake of ‘added sugars,’ defined as caloric sweeteners used by the food industry and consumers as ingredients in processed or prepared foods to increase the desirability of these foods,”

The researchers found that the respondents consuming higher amounts of added sugars had a much greater chance of low HDL levels and higher triglyceride levels.

The report concluded, “Although long-term trials to study the effect of reducing added sugars and other carbohydrates on lipid profiles are needed, our data support dietary guidelines that target a reduction in consumption of added sugar.”

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Best – Mike Cola

Demystifying  Nutrition


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